Chaldean dating online high dating

The night sky held particular importance in the lives of desert nomads, because the fiery sun was a hindrance to them, while the cool night allowed them to travel.In traveling by night, these desert nomads became keenly aware of the night sky's various landmarks, including the stars, planets and moon.

(26-27)That ancient peoples, including those thought to be "primitive," possessed this impressive knowledge, which required precise geometrical capacity as well as astronomical expertise, is a fact.

That they went to extraordinary lengths to encapsulate and memorialize it is also a fact.

According to the belief of the early civilized races of the East, the stars were the source and at the same time the heralds of everything that happened, and the right to study the "godlike science" of astrology was a privilege of the priesthood.

This was the case in Mesopotamia and Egypt, the oldest centres of civilization known to us in the East.

The most ancient dwellers on the Euphrates, the Akkado-Sumerians, were believers in judicial astrology, which was closely interwoven with their worship of the stars.

The same is true of their successors, the Babylonians and Assyrians, who were the chief exponents of astrology in antiquity….

In its entry on "Astrology," the Catholic Encyclopedia describes the development of this archaic science in the ancient world: The history of astrology is an important part of the history of the development of civilization, it goes back to the early days of the human race….

Astrology was…the foster-sister of astronomy, the science of the investigation of the heavens….

Yet, the basics of this important knowledge were preserved because the ancients used myths as mnemonic devices passed along from generation to generation.

This tradition was especially important during the thousands of years when writing was either non-existent or limited.

Another fact is that the depth of inspiration and passion reflected by these remains is indicative of the ancients’ astrotheological religious tendencies.

Tags: , ,