Dating across political lines

Flicking through Tinder, in the interest of immersive journalism, I kept seeing a biography specific to 2017.

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“Swipe left if you voted for Trump,” I’d see on one profile. The woman, a Chicago native, sought out the club because she felt politically isolated and sick of being told that she was wrong all the time.

Other versions included “If you voted for Trump, we shall not hump” and the less rhythmical, more brutal: “If you voted for Trump, swipe yourself off a cliff.” Back to the bar, over a vodka and soda, the young Trump voter is discussing dating as a conservative in New York with Roger Sachar and Jay Cruger, fellow members of a meetup group called the New York Republican Club. “A date shouldn’t be like an episode of C-SPAN,” says Cruger, a charismatic 24-year-old paralegal from the Bronx. They never shy away from talking politics, even in the sometimes combative, predominantly Democratic dating landscape of NYC. She likes Trump’s economics and thinks that New Yorkers need a different perspective of the President.

They were concerned about stigma, negative reactions from colleagues or online retribution.

Since the beginning of the year, I started noticing a new dating profile.

It’s your typical midtown Manhattan happy-hour crowd: Groups of co-workers with buckets of beer, a family of tourists and a couple at the bar enjoying the tense chemistry of a successful-looking early date.

It’s loud, the Yankees are playing the Red Sox and the doors are pulled back to allow the unseasonably cool summer air drift in from 32nd Street.“Just because I voted for someone does not mean I’m this stuff. You know nothing about me.” I suggest he might experience more of those reactions over the next three years dating in NYC. Frequently coming across the “swipe left if you voted for Trump” bio, Mike ignores the demand. I would like them to know who I am first before I openly tell them I voted for this person. Through the analysis of real data and experiments, they looked at how we react to potential suitors when armed with information about their politics.Oh, he’s racist, or he’s a Nazi or whatever the case may be. It’s not nearly as impactful as other factors like age, height, religion and skin color, but “there is evidence that shared politics affects your interest in dating someone,” Huber says.For some in the city, it’s the latest dating deal breaker.Many of the single people I spoke to for this piece, on both sides of the political spectrum, wanted to remain anonymous.On two of the main dating apps used by New Yorkers – Tinder and Bumble – you swipe right if interested in the person (and hope they do too, for a match) and left to reject the candidate.

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