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“There are some kids who cry because they can’t fight,” he says. The trainer carries him out of the ring and his brother offers a swig of water. They unwrap the bandages covering his hands in the hallway. Inside a gray four-story building in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, the paid members, staff, and faculty of NSFW – part private sex club for millenials, part digital brand marketing agency – have gathered to drink, smoke and screw in between workshops about sex, cannabis and wellness.

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Trailing behind him is fellow fighter Sel Eain Zu, or “10th House Gangster.” He’s 12. “As soon as I get into the ring, all the fear goes away and I fight,” he says. Despite its incredible violence, bouts between children as young as ten, who can earn anything from $30 to $100, are common, especially in rural areas.

With the minimum monthly wage in Myanmar hovering around $68, it’s quite a sought-after purse.

A grizzled, straight-talking man in his late thirties, Daung Thel Ni comes from a family of Lethwei fighters.

Both his father and brother, Thet Oo, also a trainer at the gym, were fighters, and he is teaching his son. Because of this unfairness there are only a few fighters [here] now.” His trainees – all boys, between 11 and 20 years old – pay a portion of their earnings in return for coaching, food, and in some cases, free lodging.

In Myanmar, where it’s still common for parents to send their children away to work, it’s thought of as more like an apprenticeship. Her tall, bespectacled boyfriend begins striking her back and rear end with a cat-o-nine-tails dungeon whip.

There are also questions about what happens when boys are injured in the ring. With witnesses moving through the space she screams pleasurably, then moans while her companion vigorously fingers her.

For some families, a skilled Lethwei child fighter is a means of escaping poverty.

While the employment of child boxers in neighboring Thailand’s Muay Thai industry has come under some scrutiny in recent years, the practice goes on, relatively unchecked, in Myanmar.

Daung Thel Ni himself left after elementary school. “You know in sport there are only two things: win or lose,” says Thet Oo.

“My teachers used to see the scars on my face and they didn’t want me to fight, but they told me: ‘Will you keep studying or will you keep fighting? “I left all my books behind and left school that day.” He says he couldn’t stop the boys from doing Lethwei even if he wanted to. “He will win the other matches.” aturday has shimmered into Sunday at the Clubhouse.

It’s only on You Tube, where clips show tiny children thrashing bony arms and legs, that commenters pour scorn on organizers.

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