What steps are involved in rb sr dating

And from the slope of the line we can compute the amount of time which has passed since the pool of matter became separated into individual objects.

See the Isochron Dating FAQ or Faure (1986, chapter 18) for technical detail.

Over time, the amounts of Pb-206 and Pb-207 will change in some samples, as these isotopes are decay end-products of uranium decay (U-238 decays to Pb-206, and U-235 decays to Pb-207).

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A young-Earther would object to all of the "assumptions" listed above.

However, the test for these assumptions is the plot of the data itself.

) and they are historically the ones posted to talk.origins more than any others.

The young-Earth argument goes something like this: helium-4 is created by radioactive decay (alpha particles are helium nuclei) and is constantly added to the atmosphere.

The actual underlying assumption is that, if those requirements have not been met, there is no reason for the data points to fall on a line.

The resulting plot has data points for each of five meteorites that contain varying levels of uranium, a single data point for all meteorites that do not, and one (solid circle) data point for modern terrestrial sediments.(I believe this argument was originally put forth by Mormon young-Earther Melvin Cook, in a letter to the editor which was published in .) But helium can and does escape from the atmosphere, at rates calculated to be nearly identical to rates of production.In order to obtain a young age from their calculations, young-Earthers handwave away mechanisms by which helium can escape.For example: Also note that the meteorite ages (both when dated mainly by Rb-Sr dating in groups, and by multiple means individually) are in exact agreement with the solar system "model lead age" produced earlier.Young-Earthers have several methods which they claim to give "upper limits" to the age of the Earth, much lower than the age calculated above (usually in the thousands of years).For example, Henry Morris says: He lead to similar results, i.e., a rate virtually identical to the estimated production flux.

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