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Most arresting is a 1960 reading of Schumann's Fantasy in C major, the middle movement, which reaches an utterly singular, harrowingly intense climax.Nobody can really say this reflects Szpilman's wartime hardships, but my intuition tells me, unmistakably, that only someone who has paid rent in the abyss could conceive such phrase readings.

The film tells the story of Wladyslaw Szpilman , a Jewish pianist in Warsaw.

It won three Oscars: best director; best actor, and best adapted screenplay.(Wednesday, March 26, 2003) Meanwhile, Roman Polanski's "The Pianist" received a huge rave in the Jerusalem Post, with William E.

You can hear it in before-and-after recordings, in which one conductor beefed up the militaristic brass, and another found a conduit for psychic pain in the music's dissonances. You could argue that such changes have most to do with how we hear. I made a point of listening to the Szpilman discs (one from the independent label BCI Eclipse and the other from the German branch of Sony Classical) before and after seeing the film.

What I heard didn't change, but the film explained a few things.

At first glance, everything about Wladyslaw Szpilman speaks of a certain kind of Central European comfort, of a pleasantly uneventful, bourgeois life.

Dressed in a tweed jacket and tie, speaking of popular music and songs, Szpilman himself initially gives off the air of someone who has lived all of his 87 years in civilised surroundings. The German found me when I was in the ruins of someone's kitchen, looking for food.The decision was announced by author and broadcaster Frank Delaney, chairman of the judges, who had selected it earlier this evening from a shortlists of four titles: "When you read this book - and you must read it - you will never forget it.The subtext asks whether good people were on the side of the evil people and shows how the human spirit is enlarged by the knowledge of such people."e lives in a neat, narrow house with a small, well-kept garden.Then, effortlessly, he moves from the familiar to the horrific. I found out later - this isn't in the book - that he was looking for toothpaste, but no matter.When he saw me, he asked me what on earth was I doing there ... I couldn't say that I was Jewish, that I was hiding, that I had been in these ruins for months.The son of the Polish Holocaust survivor who was the subject of Roman Polanski 's Oscar-winning film "The Pianist" hailed the awards as a tribute to the victims of World War II.

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